Scone Scouts celebrates its 100 year centenary

IT was a weekend for telling stories and sharing memories.

And, across Scone, the faces of members –  past and present – were overcome with gratification as they recalled the many adventures they had encountered through scouting over the years.

Leaders, members and guests both local and from as far as Bathurst and Port Macquarie gathered on Saturday to celebrate 100 years of continuous scouting in Scone.

As a salute to scouting – an official commemoration ceremony followed by games, the unveiling of a special centenary plaque and the cutting of a birthday cake kicked off the festivities which continued into the evening.

MEMORABILIA: The Scone Scout hall was decorated with past and present scouting memorabilia on Saturday September 9.

MEMORABILIA: The Scone Scout hall was decorated with past and present scouting memorabilia on Saturday September 9.

Scone Scout leader Greg Morris said he was impressed with the amount of people that turned up and it was because of them scouting has been able to continue.

“Scone Scouts has always been there watching young scouts grow and achieve,” he said.

Current cubs, scouts and venturers shared what they liked about scouting with comments ranging from “roasting marshmallows on the fire,” “going on hikes, camping and having adventures,” to “learning life skills from first aid, cooking and tying knots.”

As part of Scone Scouts 100 year centenary celebrations, current scouts shared their stories with The Scone Advocate from past and present scouting adventures.

Scouting in the 1960s

To get a sense that scouting hasn’t always been the same, the current scouts interviewed a few Queen’s Scouts about scouting in the 1960s. Here are their stories:

Three senior scouts were hiking through the hills near Washpools. On the last night, they were camped a mile from the young scouts who were camped at the Washpools. During the night, they sneaked up on the scout camp and lit tuppeny-bungers next to the Scouts’ tents, sending the two groups of younger scouts into fights as to who set them off. When they calmed down they set two more off to restart the debate.

Chloe Green / Lachlan Barnes

Camp food was different - sometimes the local farmer would donate a whole a sheep. With scouts preparing it for camp food. There was no packet or tin food. They would go eel chasing for food as well. You didn’t need a fishing licence in those days no restrictions as to Yabbing in local creeks.

Jesse Ridges

The 1964 Newcastle and Hunter Area Senior Scout Venture was held at Lake Glenbawn with Scone’s Matthew Flinders Senior Scout Patrol winning the camp competition.

They described how in one course the other groups followed the waters edge weaving in and out, while the Scone lads went up a hill and travelled along the ridge lines. Because of this alternate route they made it to the finish first. Along the way each group had to draw a sketch of the lake and its surrounds. Whilst other groups went three quarters of the way up the hill to draw a sketch the Scone lads at the top were able to sketch the entire lake including an island in the middle that could only be seen from the top of the mountain.

As a result of these successes they managed to win whole competition. The plaque still hangs at the hall to this day.

Cohen Jackson

THEN: This is the oldest photo in existence of the cubs in 1928. Craig Clark, who is in the photo, also turns 100 in September this year. At the time, they met in the Drill Hall which is now the Willowgate Hall.

THEN: This is the oldest photo in existence of the cubs in 1928. Craig Clark, who is in the photo, also turns 100 in September this year. At the time, they met in the Drill Hall which is now the Willowgate Hall.

Scouting today

To get a sense of scouting today the current lads told their stories:

This year, Scone Scouts and Venturers joined 70 others from across the Hunter and Coastal region in attending the first ANZAC camp at Fort Scratchley, Newcastle. While there, we participated in many things such as a tour on board the HMAS Newcastle and Fighter World at Williamtown. We attended many civic functions over the 4 days and had the honour of watching the Newcastle dawn service from the battlements of Fort Scratchley! We could sleep anywhere within Fort Scratchley, in swags that were given to us at the camp. Over the weekend, we participated in many fun events and activities.

Ryan Weatherley

After a long hike, up Mt Moobi, we were trekking through the bush on goat tracks and through gullies we eventually found a fork in the track. We didn’t know which direction to go as we wanted to find the nearest house. Then along the track came a house dog and we had the bright idea of following the dog back to its house. From the house we could regain our bearings and then went through many paddocks to eventually find our way to the cars to go home.

Liam Guilfoyle

One recent camp we went on was at Tilses orchard, we were allowed to pick the apples and play all through the apple orchard. Scout camps nowadays, when we go camping now we have to plan weeks ahead of time so we know that we will have enough supplies, tents etc. When we at arrive at camp we setup all of the tents, the kitchen area and the dining fly. Some activities that we do at camp are playing games, hiking, swimming, badge work and eating. When the sun goes down and the moon comes up we do many different activities like spotlight, shadow puppets, singing around the camp fire and drinking hot chocolate.

Josh Jackson

Throughout scouting there are many opportunities to learn new skills, make new friends and experience new things. But in opinion of many, there are no greater opportunities than Jamborees. Held every 3 years, Australian Jamboree are a two-week long camp where scout groups from around Australia and other countries come to one area to connect and do a wide variety of activities. At the start of 2016 I was lucky enough to go such an exciting event and do activities like races around Sydney, go to water parks and do activities like rock climbing and abseiling and tons more.

New Zealand Jamborees are held over the ditch every 3 years. Luckily I was given the opportunity to go to a Jamboree in New Zealand last January. A similar experience but this time I was in a visitor in a new and exciting place. In New Zealand, everything the Scouts do there is so different including the activities like range shooting.

In the long and short of things, Scouts is the best place to enjoy new experiences like Jamborees. 

Cohen Jackson

NOW: Current group taken in 2017 outside of the Scone Scout Hall.

NOW: Current group taken in 2017 outside of the Scone Scout Hall.