Aviation icon inducted

A very deserved man of Scone will be firmly embedded in aviation history next month when the late Col Pay is inducted into the Australian Aviation Hall of Fame. 

The late Col Pay will be inducted into the Australian Aviation Hall of Fame next month for his host of aviation achievements. 
Photo courtesy Craig Justo

The late Col Pay will be inducted into the Australian Aviation Hall of Fame next month for his host of aviation achievements. Photo courtesy Craig Justo

The man who is known for his excellence in aviation and creation of the successful local business Pay’s Air Service, will be formally inducted at a Gala Induction Dinner in Wagga Wagga where his son Ross, daughter in law Ann-Maree, wife Dianne and other family and Pay’s representatives will attend. 

Designed to ‘honour the past and inspire the future’, the Hall of Fame was created in 2010 by the Regional Aviation Association of Australia chief executive officer Paul Tyrrell and the Australian Aviation Forum chairman and retired Qantas chief pilot Chris Manning.

Among those already recognised for their outstanding contribution to aviation are Lawrence Hargrave, Sir Charles Kingsford Smith, The Duigan Brothers, Charles Maxwell Hazelton, Freda Mary Thompson and Wilfred Arthur Baird, just to name a few.

Being a recipient of many accolades including Excellence in Aviation awards, Mr Pay had a love of all things flying from an early age, going on to become an experienced and well respected flying instructor and become one of Australia’s pioneers of aerial top dressing, spraying and crop dusting.

A regular performer at air shows in his refurbished warbirds, Mr Pay was a leader in the establishment of the warbird movement in Australia and it was through his efforts Scone became a ecca for aircraft enthusiasts.

Mr Pay was nominated for the induction by Phil Hirst and the Australian Aerial Agricultural Association, and although Ross, Pay’s Air Service managing director, is a director on the board he wasn’t aware of the nomination. 

Mr Pay said it’s nice to see his father being recognised for what he did for aerial agriculture, the training of pilots and war aircraft. 

“I’m proud that he has finally got some recognition for all his achievements. 

“Even though dad has been gone for nearly seven years now, he’s still being recognised and remembered,” he said. 

“Dad never chased recognition, but I appreciate that he has been honoured in this way.”

Mr Pay is influenced by his dad every day in continuing the business he established so firmly.

“Everything he did motivates me to do what I’m doing now,” Mr Pay said. 

It seems the passion for flying has been passed down the line further to Ross’ children, as one son has already learnt to fly, another son is learning and his daughter is due to start in the Christmas holidays. 

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