The risk of bloat will probably continue for the next 4-6 weeks depending on rainfall says HLLS, district vet, Jane Bennett

From warnings about nutritional needs to warnings about the likelihood of bloat.

What a contrast a year can make.

Much of our region is ready to 'bloom' thanks to the arrival of warmer weather.

Hunter Local Land Services district vetreinarian Jane Benett said one of the disadvantages of such a great season over late winter and heading into spring is an increase in clover, medics and other legumes in pasture ahead of grass growth.

"Along with this increased growth is an increased risk of bloat in cattle and sheep," she said.

"Over the last week I have already seen several deaths from bloat in cattle and have reports of several more.

"The risk of bloat will probably continue for the next 4-6 weeks depending on rainfall and temperature. Remember bloat can occur on other feed as well- I have seen it on straight rye grass and oats as well as clover.

I"t's important to have a good drive through your paddocks and assess the amount of clover present and treat accordingly."

The risk can be minimised by making sure 5 in 1 vaccinations are up to date, using bloat oil on trough water, using bloat blocks if on dam/creek water, supplementing with a roughage source.

Another management tool required to reduced the risk of bloat is keeping cattle off feed for the minimum amount of time possible so hungry cattle don't go out and gorge themselves on clover. and other lush pastures.

If you have further queries please contact your local District Vet from Hunter LLS on 1300 795 299 or follow us on facebook or visit our website https://www.lls.nsw.gov.au/regions/hunter for updates and information.

The risk of bloat will probably continue for the next 4-6 weeks depending on rainfall and temperature said Jane Bennett.

The risk of bloat will probably continue for the next 4-6 weeks depending on rainfall and temperature said Jane Bennett.